Baltimore & Ohio Depot Maps and Aerial Photos

Flora to Shawneetown


At least 16 depots were built by the railroad along the line from Flora to Shawneetown.  Five flag stations have been found on B & O schedules and maps from 1874 to 1977 in the counties of Gallatin, White, Wayne, and Clay.  The list of depots and stations is arranged from south to north with the milepost.

New Shawneetown and Flora have depot buildings still standing.  The Flora Depot has a museum.

The Prairie Trunk was the last owner of the railway.  After declaring bankruptcy, their assets were sold.  The rails and associated equipment were ripped from the land, leaving very little trace of a resource that had been an integral part of rural southeastern Illinois

A present day Google map image of the town, aerial photos from the 1930s, and a description is provided if enough data was found.



Clay County 1928
Clay County

Wayne County 1928
Wayne County

White County 1928
White County

Gallatin County 1928
Gallatin County

  1928 Railroad Maps of Illinois Collection  

B & O Station IconB & O depots.
B & O stops and trackStops without a depot have a blue marker.
The track is red blue.
L & N Station IconL & N depots.
L & N stops and trackStops without a depot have a red marker.
The track is shaded blue.
Joint Rail PathThe joint rail path is shaded yellow.

Click a map or aerial photo to see a larger version.



B & O Scheduled Stops


MilepostTownStop Type
0Shawneetowndepot
0.7Wyattjunction
3.1New Shawneetowndepot
4.2Duncanflag
5.8Junctiondepot
8.3Bartleyflag
11.4Ridgwaydepot
14.8Wellsflag
18.2Omahadepot
21.7Middlepointdepot
24.9Norris Citydepot
29Sacramentodepot
33.1Enfielddepot
39Springertondepot
43.5Mill Shoalsdepot
47Barnhillflag
50Hubbardsflag
52.9Fairfielddepot
57.8Geffdepot
62.9Cisnedepot
68Rinarddepot
74Floradepot

Milepost 0 / 0.7

Shawneetown / Wyatt



Shawneetown B & O Depot
From west to east between 3rd St. and 2nd St.
From north to south between Locust and Market

L & N depot
From west to east 4th St. and Grant 3rd St.
From north to south between Locust and Market

Shawneetown was the B & O's first station on the 74 mile track from Ohio River to Flora.  From Flora the line extended to the Illinois River at Beardstown, a total of 228 miles.

Connections from the railroads could be made to the Norfolk and Washington, DC Steamboat Company Steamers on the Ohio River that were part of the Evansville, Paducah, and Cairo Line owned and operated by the Tennessee and Ohio River Transportation Company.

Both the L & N and B & O had wyes for turning around locomotives at Shawneetown.  Maps show circular track between the two railways that connected to the barge terminal conveyer belts.  Material could be loaded into cars, positioned on the circular track, then connected to the railroad that would ship the cargo north.

Milepost 0.7 known as Wyatt on the B & O schedule was the junction with the L & N railroad that had a depot just west of the B & O.  The next 5.3 miles of track that extended to the west side of the town of Junction were shared between the two railroads.  According to the Sentinel 2nd Quarter 2015 Magazine, the B & O agreement to perform track maintenance while sharing the cost with the L & N dated back to the 1870's.

On November 12, 1875, the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad announced plans to extend the Springfield branch over the Ohio River through Kentucky and connect with the Columbus and Chattanooga Railroad.  The railroad bridge was never constructed.

B & O Sentinel Magazine, 2nd quarter 2015

Mattoon Gazette (Mattoon, Illinois) 12 Nov 1875, Fri  • Page 4

Milepost 3.1

New Shawneetown


Milepost 3.1 map


New Shawneetown B & O depot
North of Fulton Street between McLean Road and Edison St.

It is one of two depots that are still standing along this route.

In 1937, the midwest experienced a devasting flood.  For Shawneetown, it was one of several in a line of similar tragic events.  New Shawneetown was established and most of the residences and businesses relocated.  Plans for a depot building were announced in January, 1938.  The possibility of a Union Staton with Louisville and Nashville railroad was rumored.  The aerial photo above doesn't indicate a new building in the summer of 1938.  A spur off the main line and some large buildings that perhaps contained supplies for the reconstruction and resettlement effort are visible.

The B & O schedules show the new town as New Shawneetown and the old one as Shawneetown.

Google maps labels the new town Shawneetown and the old one as as Old Shawneetown.


Dixon Evening Telegraph (Dixon, Illinois) 26 Jan 1938, Wed  • Page 6



Milepost 4.2

Duncan


Milepost 4.2 map

The 1923 B & O schedule lists Duncan at milepost 4.2.

On March 31, 1913, rail service from Flora to Shawneetown was stopped at Barnhill because of flood waters south to Shawneetown.  Telegraph communications were lost to Shawneetown but remain connected to Duncan.


The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) 01 Apr 1913, Tue  • Page 3

1923 B & O public passenger timetable provided by Duane Carrell

Milepost 5.8

Junction / Cypress Junction


Milepost 5.8 map

Junction B & O depot
Northwest corner of Front and East St.

Junction L & N depot
Northwest corner of Front and Main St.

The village nearest the B & O and L & N junction north of Shawneetown, Illinois has had several names over the years.  The earliest O & M schedules have St. L & S. E. Junction.  The milepost was eventually shortened to Junction

According to the Goodspeed Publishing book on the history of five southern Illinois counties, the grade between Shawneetown and Equality was completed in 1840.


History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin, and Williamson Counties, Illinois by Goodspeed Publishing, 1887.

People of the State of Illinois et al., Petitioners, v. United States of America and Interstate Commerce Commission,respondents, 604 F.2d 519 (7th Cir. 1979)

Milepost 8.3

Bartley


Milepost 8 map

A community of Bartley was located between Junction and Ridgway on old maps.



Milepost 11.4

Ridgway


Milepost 11.4 map

Ridgway B & O depot
Southwest corner of Edwards and Baltimore St.

Ridgway is known for farming, specifically popcorn.  The depot was located in the middle of town.

The village or Ridgway was named for Thomas S. Ridgway from Shawneetown.  Mr. Ridgway was president of the Shawneetown Branch of the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad when the railway was built from Shawneetown to Beardstown.



History of Gallatin, Saline, Hamilton, Franklin, and Williamson Counties, Illinois, The Goodspeed Publishing, Co., 1887. pp. 51, 118

Milepost 14.8

Wells


Milepost 14.8 map

The 1923 B & O schedule lists Duncan at milepost 14.8.



1923 B & O public passenger timetable provided by Duane Carrell

Milepost 18.2

Omaha


Milepost 18.2 map

Omaha B & O depot
Southeast corner of Harrel Ave. and 1st St.

Omaha was also a farming community.  The name Omaha was suggested by the St. Louis & Southeastern Railroad's first baggage-master that had held the same position in Omaha, Nebraska.  The village had a post office.

My cousins Carrie and Ralph helped identify the location of the former depot.  Andy Pritchett stated that there was a staging area south of Omaha where farmers could load cattle onto train cars but no more information is available.

According to The Daily Sentinel newspaper in Woodstock, Illinois, on February 4, 1937, water at the Omaha depot was up to the eaves of the structure.



History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, p 958

Milepost 21.7

Middlepoint / Roland


Milepost 21 map

Middlepoint / Roland Station
Northwest 1/4 of Section 11 in Indian Creek Township

Middlepoint / Roland are names given to Milepost 21.      Middle Point was closest to the railroad while Roland was east of the rail.  Edward Oliver provided the location of the former station.  Post Offices were established at both Middle Point and Roland.

Middlepoint had a depot that was a shed with an open side facing the tracks from 1873 until sometime after the post office closed in 1904.



Ghost Towns of Southern Illinois - Glenn J. Sneed

History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, p 528, 897.

Milepost 24.9

Norris City / Norris


Milepost 24.9 map

Norris City B & O depot
Northwest corner of Main and North Division St.

New York Central (Big Four) depot
1st - Northwest corner of Division and 3rd St
2nd - Northeast corner of present day Industrial Road and the railroad

Norris City was known as Norris in the early days of the railroad.  A depot was constructed and in operation by the Springfield and Illinois Southeastern Railroad by September, 1871.  

The New York Central Railroad crossed the B & O rail at two different locations over the years.  The first was just south of the B & O depot.  A map is shown on the B & O photos page.  The second intersection was further south on Industrial Road.

An article by Duane Carrell titled B & O's Springfield Sub-Division in the B & O Historical Society's Sentinel Magazine, issue 2nd Qtr 2015, details the B & O's assistance with the War Emergency Pipeline in Norris City.  A wye was installed by the New York Central Railway that connected the two tracks.  Locomotives could turnaround and pull forward to the oil terminal.  Railroads at War by S. Kip Farrington, Jr, provides detail of the War Emergency pipeline facility operations.  Norris City helped alleviate an oil shortage on the east coast and enabled the United States to provide fuel for the war effort in Europe since German submarines had made it difficult to transport cargo from the Gulf of Mexico to the east coast.  The pipeline is still in operation at the Norris City terminal.


A coal mine was located on the northern edge of Norris City and the village had a post office.



B & O Sentinel Magazine, 2nd quarter 2015

History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, p 528

Norris City History File, Norris City Library

Milepost 29

Sacramento


Milepost 29 map

Sacramento B & O depot
Southwest corner of Water St. and the railroad

The Sacramento depot was located west of highway 45 north of Norris City in a small farming community.  In his book, Ghost Towns of Southern Illinois, Glenn Sneed provides a glimpse of what it was like at milepost 29.  Before the railroad came, a community and post office had been founded with the name of the Rattle Snake in 1852.  In 1857, a village was established with the name Sacramento.  The post office did not change its identification to Sacramento until December, 1861.  When the railroad was built, the station was a flag stop with an open-side shed facing the tracks serving as the depot.  There was a feed mill, cream station, and stock pens.  More cream was shipped from Sacramento than the sum of Norris City and Enfield in the beginning.  Hogs and cattle were also shipped from the stop.  The Cairo and Vincennes Railroad had surveyed Sacramento as a candidate for the crossing with the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad.  However, Norris City was chosen for the crossing and the community of Sacramento begin a descent.

The Macedonia Baptist Church met in the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad Depot at Sacramento before constructing their own building.  The church still stands and can be seen on the aerial photo and Google maps today.



Ghost Towns of Southern Illinois - Glenn J. Sneed

History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, pp 523, 879

Milepost 33.1

Enfield


Milepost 33.1 map

Enfield B & O depot
Northeast corner of Railway Ave. and Gowdy Ave

Enfield had a depot for an unknown number of years.  The Louisville & Nashville Railroad intersected just north of the facility.  Tracks were removed when the Prairie Trunk Railway went out of business but a northern section has been relaid on the path of the old B & O.  The short spur enables grain cars to be prepared for shipment along the Evansville Western Railway.

The village had a post office.



History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, pp 528

Milepost 39

Springerton / Springer


Milepost 39 map

Springerton B & O depot
Southeast corner of Upston St and Railway Ave

Milepost 39 was known as Springer and then as Springerton on railroad schedules.  It still is a farming community and had a depot for a period of time and a post office.

The first name of Springerville was changed to Springerton when the railroad was built.


History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, pp 528, 905

Milepost 43.5

Mill Shoals


Milepost 43.5 map

Mill Shoals B & O depot
Northwest corner of Linder and Railroad St

Millshoals had a depot and then a small trailer that my grandfather and Bob Dagg worked at the end of his career with the B & O.  The community also had a post office.



History of White County, Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883, pp 528, 905

Milepost 47

Barnhill


Milepost 47 map

Barnhill B & O station
Northeast corner of Main and railroad

Barnhill was located in Barnhill Township at milepost 47.  Although the train stopped at Barnhill a depot was never built by the railroad.  There was a store that served the function of a depot and a second track along the area.  The Ohio & Mississippi Railroad did not keep the pledge to build two depots in Barhnill Township so the citizens rescinded their contribution of funds for the effort.

On March 31, 1913, rail service from Flora to Shawneetown was stopped at Barnhill because of flood waters south to Shawneetown.  Telegraph communications were lost to Shawneetown but remain connected to Duncan north of Shawneetown.



The Courier-Journal (Louisville, Kentucky) 01 Apr 1913, Tue  • Page 3

Barnhill maps and information from Judith Puckett, Wayne County Historical Society

History of Wayne and Clay Counties Illinois, Globe Publishing Co, 183 Lake Street, Chicago, IL, 1884, p 201.

Milepost 50

Hubbards


Milepost 50 map

Hubbard B & O station
Northeast corner of Main and railroad

Old maps and schedules show Hubbards and Hubbard listed as the stop at milepost 50.  Hubbard was a part of Barnhill Township.  Although the train stopped at Hubbard a depot was never built.  The Ohio & Mississippi Railroad did not keep the pledge to build two depots in Barhnill Township so the citizens rescinded their contribution of funds for the effort.

Judith Puckett learned from Karlene Worley that "Hubbard's Crossing" was where the railroad intersected the main road.  "Hubbard's Switch" was a place to meet just northwest of the intersection.  There as only one track through Hubbard and only an old building in that area, not a depot.

Trains would stop and pick up passengers, milk, cream, and eggs.



History of Wayne and Clay Counties Illinois, Globe Publishing Co, 183 Lake Street, Chicago, IL, 1884, p 201.

Gilead Church, the Crossing, and the Switch, Interview of Karlene Worley by Judith Puckett, Wayne County Historical Society

Milepost 52.9

Fairfield


Milepost 52.9 map

Fairfield B & O depot
Northwest corner of Main and the railroad

The first depot at Fairfield owned by the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad burnt and was replaced with a brick structure.

Eventually a second railroad crossed the B & O south of the town.  The rail started as an idea in 1837 between New Albany, IN and Alton, IL.  In 1869, Indiana charted the New Albany & St. Louis Railroad Company.  Illinois then charted the St. Louis, Mt. Carmel & New Albany Railroad Company.  In July, 1870, these were joined under the name: New Albany & St. Louis Railroad Company.  The project faltered until February, 1879, when a reorganization spurred the completion of the railway system.  Partered with the Louisville & Nashville railroad at Mt. Vernon, IL.  This combination transitioned to the Southern Railroad and trains still run through Fairfield under the Norfolk Southern flag.



American Railroad Journal, Volume 45, 1872

History of Wayne and Clay Counties Illinois, Globe Publishing Co, 183 Lake Street, Chicago, IL, 1884, p 185.

Biographical and Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott, and Washington, Indiana, Chicago Printing Company, 1889, p. 140.

Milepost 57.8

Geff / Jeffersonville


Milepost 57.8 map

Geff B & O depot
Southeast corner of Wayne and the railroad

The town at Milepost 57.8 started on the railroad schedule as Jeffersonville.  By 1878, it had been changed to Geff.  Various sources state the railroad wanted to eliminate confusion with Jeffersonville, Indiana.  Another attributed the change to the post office for mail being sent to the wrong destination.



Milepost 62.9

Cisne


Milepost 62.9 map

Cisne B & O depot
Southwest corner of Park and the railroad

The town of Cisne was started as a result of the building of the Springfield Division of the Ohio & Mississippi railroad.  The railroad depot was the second building built and the first post office was at the rail facility.



History of Wayne and Clay Counties Illinois, Globe Publishing Co, 183 Lake Street, Chicago, IL, 1884, p. 237.

Milepost 68

Rinard


Milepost 68 map

Rinard B & O depot
Northeast corner of Broadway and the railroad

The origin of the village of Rinard was related to the railroad.  The vice-president of the firm approached residents about purchasing oats.  An agreement was reached and side track installed.  The first depot was a box car.  When a building was built in the spring of 1871, it was the second structure in the settlement.  It served as the first post office location as well.  R. L. Wilcox was the only station agent because the building burned.  The second depot was a shed with a side open on the east end.



Leaving Rinard on Facebook by Ed McCormick.

History of Wayne and Clay Counties Illinois, Globe Publishing Co, 183 Lake Street, Chicago, IL, 1884, p. 240.

Milepost 74

Flora


Milepost 74 map

Flora B & O depot
Northeast corner of State St and railroad
Flora B & O roundhouse
Northwest corner of State St and railroad

Flora's first depot was built by the town and then bought by the railroad around 1872.  Flora became a primary crossroads for commerce in the area because of the rails that connected from the Mississippi to Wabash Rivers in one direction and the Illinois and Ohio Rivers in the other.  Wayne and Clay counties shipped over 137,500 bushels of apples in one season around 1884 as a result of the railroad connections.

The brick version of the Flora Depot was constructed in 1917.  The two tracks used to cross but after passenger service was removed from the southern route the rail was reconfigured into two junctions to the east and west.  The St. Louis route was the more profitable and longer lasting of the two rails.  According to the CSX Illinois Subdivision blog by Michael Monken, the CSX railroad has suspended service between Flora and East St. Louis.  The future of this route is not clear.  There was a roundhouse across from the depot for equipment maintenance and repair.  It burnt in the early 1950s.  The depot building is one of two that still stands along the southerly route to the Ohio River.  The other is at New Shawneetown.  Flora's building is now a museum and designated a Historic Place in the National Register.  The museum is definitely worth a visit for those interested in local railroad history.



History of Wayne and Clay Counties Illinois, Globe Publishing Co, 183 Lake Street, Chicago, IL, 1884, p. 343, 368 - 369.

CSX Illinois Subdivision History

Flora depot museum

Herald Review depot history

Flora Roundhouse


Flora Roundhouse Closer Aerial
Flora Roundhouse Fire 1950s
Flora Roundhouse fire in early 1950s
Photo on display at Flora Depot Museum

After devastion by fire, the roundhouse at Flora was not rebuilt by the railroad. According to Bob Dagg, former B & O employee and coworker with my grandpa, the railway turntable was rarely used when he worked there and was removed in the early 1970s and the pit filled.  Steam locomotives were not built for extended reverse operations while diesel locomotives were able to reverse over greater distances and use wye structures to turn around.